Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

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Seagrass Projects

To successfully protect Florida's seagrasses, FWRI staff members work on many different types of aquatic vegetation-related projects. Some of FWRI's current biological research, monitoring, and mapping projects are described in this section.



Evaluating Suwannee River Discharge Effects on Water Quality in Big Bend Region

Scientists are developing methods to relate satellite imagery to water quality in Florida’s Big Bend region to protect seagrass habitats.

Springs Coast Seagrass Monitoring

Scientists are evaluating the health of seagrass beds in the Springs Coast region.

Accelerating Recovery of Seagrass Habitats

Researchers are working to develop a cost-effective, reliable procedure to accelerate recovery of seagrass habitats.

A Comparison of Mechanical and Manual Seagrass Planting Techniques at Three Sites in Tampa Bay

Until recently, seagrass restoration was accomplished by labor-intensive, hand-planting methods. Mechanical installation may speed the seagrass planting process and, potentially, allow habitat restoration at a lower cost.

Florida Bay Fisheries Habitat Assessment Program (FHAP)

The Florida Bay Fisheries Assessment Program is a project designed to assess the distribution and status of Florida Bay fisheries habitats in which seagrasses and microalgae are present.

Turtle Grass Health Study Yields New Approach to Ecosystem Assessment

An assessment of turtle grass populations helped develop the methods and framework for a statewide seagrass management program that is still ongoing.

Pools and Fluxes of Nutrients in Florida Bay Sediments

This article discusses a project designed to determine the if there are links between sediment nutrients and Florida Bay phytoplankton blooms.

Seagrass Light Monitoring Network for Florida Bay

The Seagrass Light Monitoring Network for Florida Bay is participating in a long-term effort to measure sunlight available to seagrass at sites throughout Florida Bay.

Seagrass Restoration

Seagrass restoration will be both economically and environmentally beneficial to Tampa Bay. In addition to improving water quality, healthy seagrass beds benefit important fishery species such as snook, seatrout, and shrimp.

Seagrass Recovery

Learn about seagrass recovery.


FWC Facts:
Brown hoplo, a nonnative, armored catfish, is found throughout central and south Florida. They can survive in low-oxygen backwaters and ditches, where they gulp air at the surface.

Learn More at AskFWC