Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

Non-native-marine

Nonnative Marine Life

Read information about the nonnative species found in Florida and learn how you can help FWRI monitor the health of Florida's marine organisms.



Tiger Prawn Intrudes in Florida Waters

Report sightings of this nonnative shrimp to the Fish Kill Hotline.

First-Known Lionfish Caught in Florida's Gulf Coast Waters

In October 2006, FWRI researchers received the first-known lionfish caught in Florida's Gulf coast waters.

Asian Green Mussels

The Asian green mussel (Perna viridis) was found in Tampa Bay in late 1999.

Ballast Water and the Transport of Harmful Algae

Numerous aquatic organisms may be introduced into nonnative environments when commercial cargo ships exchange ballast water with nearshore waters. FWRI is investigating the risks of potentially harmful microalgae entering Tampa Bay through ballast water.

Monitoring the Health of Florida's Marine Organisms

The Fish and Wildlife Health Group at the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, based in St. Petersburg, Florida, is concerned with the health status of Florida's marine and estuarine organisms.

Gallery

View images of nonnative marine life found in Florida waters.



FWC Facts:
Florida's largest estuary, Tampa Bay, covers 440 square miles and has more than 300 species of inshore fish.

Learn More at AskFWC