Selected references and additional reading

The following references provide information on the natural history and biology of the endangered wood stork:

Brooks, W. B., and T. Dean. 2008. Measuring the biological status of the U.S. population of wood storks. Waterbirds (Special Publication 1) 31:50-59.

Bryan, A. L., Jr. W. B. Brooks, J. D. Taylor, D. M. Richardson, C.W. Jeske, and I. L. Brisbin, Jr. 2008. Satellite tracking large-scale movements of wood storks captured in the Gulf coastal region. Waterbirds (Special Publication 1) 31:35-41.

Coulter, M. C., J. A. Rodgers, Jr., J. C. Ogden, and F. C. Depkin. 1999. Wood Stork (Mycteria americana). In The Birds of North America, No. 409 (A. Poole and F. Gill, eds.). The Birds of North America, Inc., Philadelphia, PA.

Kushlan, J. A., and P. C. Frohring. 1986. The history of the southern Florida Wood Stork population. Wilson Bulletin 98:368-386.

Nesbitt, S. A., J. C. Ogden, H. W. Kale, II, B. W. Patty, and L. A. Rowse. 1982. Florida atlas of breeding sites for herons and their allies: 1976-78. FWS/OBS-81-49. Office of Biological Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D.C.

Ogden, J. C., D. A. McCrimmon, Jr., G. T. Bancroft, and B. W. Patty. 1987. Breeding populations of the Wood Stork in the southeastern United States. Condor 89:752-759.

Rodgers, J. A., Jr., and S. T. Schwikert. 1997. Breeding success and chronology of Wood Storks Mycteria americana in northern and central Florida, U.S.A. Ibis 139:76-91.

Rodgers, J. A., Jr., P. S. Kubilis, S. A. Nesbitt, M. F. Delany, K. T. Bowman, J. B. Dodge, R. K. Felix, Jr., and J. Swan. 2002. Atlas of breeding sites for colonial waterbirds in Florida during 1999. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Bureau of Wildlife Diversity Conservation, 620 South Meridian Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1600.

Rodgers, J. A., Jr., S. T. Schwikert, G. A. Griffin, W. B. Brooks, D. Bear-Hull, P. M. Elliot, K. J. Ebersol, and J. Morris. 2008. Productivity of wood storks (Mycteria Americana) in north and central Florida. Waterbirds 31(Special Publication 1) 31:25-34.

Runde, D. E., J. A. Gore, J. A. Hovis, M. S. Robson, and P. D. Southall. 1991. Florida atlas of breeding sites for herons and their allies--update 1986-89. Tallahassee, Florida: Nongame Wildlife Program Technical Report no. 10, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission.

The Waterbird Society publishes papers on wood storks and other wading birds: http://www.waterbirds.org/

USFWS. 1997. Revised recovery plan for the U.S. breeding population of the wood stork. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Atlanta, Georgia.

USFWS. 2000. Wood stork (Mycteria americana). Pages 183-213 in Multi-species recovery plan for south Florida. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Vero Beach, Florida.



FWC Facts:
Manatees feed for 6 to 8 hours daily, consuming about 4 to 9 percent of their body weight in wet vegetation, such as seagrass and other aquatic plants.

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