Potash Corp - White Springs Wildlife Management Area

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PotashCorp - White Springs

 

Photo of PotashCorp - White Springs WMA
Scott Johns

PotashCorp - White Springs WMA is located on active phosphate mining lands in southeast Hamilton County. Four phosphate settling ponds covering nearly 4,000 acres are open for waterfowl hunting. Hunting is restricted to boats with electric motors. No wading is permitted due to the unstable nature of the pond bottoms. These ponds produce abundant invertebrates and plankton on which waterfowl feed. The most abundant species are shovelers and blue- and green-winged teal. Varying depths of water attract everything from white pelicans to black-bellied whistling ducks and occasional rarities like red-necked phalaropes and black terns. This area is a site on the Great Florida Birding Trail. For bird watching, access is available only to groups by advance reservation on the first and third Saturdays of October, February, March, April and May. Individual birders may call and ask to join a group with an existing reservation. Groups can drive/hike the dikes around the settling ponds. For reservations call (386) 397-8313. Camping is prohibited on the area.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.
  • Hunting with dogs is prohibited, except that waterfowl retrievers may be used. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.



FWC Facts:
Within 24 hours of hatching, young whooping cranes can follow their parents away from the nest. Together, they forage for plants, insects, snakes, frogs and small animals.

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