Holton Creek Wildlife Management Area

Managed in cooperation with
Suwannee River Water Management District
Florida Forest Service

 

photo of Holton Creek campsite
Edwin McCook
Suwannee River WMD

Holton Creek WMA is located in south central Hamilton County. This land was acquired under the Save Our Rivers program to protect limestone outcrops and lush seepage slopes along 10 winding miles of the Upper Suwannee River. More than 2,000 acres of river bluff hardwoods and pine plantations contain two first-magnitude springs that flow into the Suwannee River. Horseback riding, bicycling, hiking, wildlife viewing, and fishing are allowed.  Children under the age of 16 are required to wear a helmet when horseback riding on public lands.  For more detailed information go to Nicole's Law PDF.  All horseback riders must have proof of current negative Coggins Test results for their horses when on state lands.  Wildlife on the area include wild turkey, white-tailed deer, gray squirrel, eastern cottontail rabbit, gopher tortoise, raccoon, American alligator, and red-tailed hawk. The Florida Trail winds along the riverfront for many miles. Mobility-impaired general gun hunts are held on the area in the fall, and mobility-impaired turkey hunts are held on the area in the spring. This area is a site on the Great Florida Birding Trail.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.
  • Hunting with dogs is prohibited. Dogs on leashes may be used for trailing wounded game. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.



FWC Facts:
One of Florida's smallest owls, the burrowing owl lives in open, treeless areas.

Learn More at AskFWC