Tosohatchee Wildlife Management Area

Tosohatchee Wildlife Management Area (WMA) covers 30,701 acres along 19 miles of the St. Johns River in eastern Orange County. Meandering creeks, lush cabbage palm hammocks, slash pine flatwoods, cypress swamps, and freshwater marshes form an integral part of the 3600-square-mile St. Johns River watershed. These habitats, and those of adjacent public lands, are essential to clean and store the water supplying the St. John's River.

An abundance of birds, both resident and migratory, and wildlife such as white-tailed deer, bobcat, fox squirrel, alligators, and otters flourish here. Bromeliads and orchids festoon tree trunks and limbs, ferns carpet the hammocks, and wildflowers such as spring blooming irises add swaths of color to the landscape.

photo of Tootoosahatchee Creek by Jim Blush
Tootoosahatchee Creek

The rare hand fern finds protection here, as does another botanical treasure - cutthroat grass. Tucked in along a portion of James Creek Swamp is a pocket of old-growth cypress trees that escaped extensive logging activities during the last century.

An extensive network of more than 60 miles of trailsAdobe PDF attracts hikers and backpackers, bicyclists, and equestrians. Primitive camping is available for organized youth groups, equestrians, and hikers. Popular fishing spots include two man-made lakes, the St. Johns River, and numerous creeks and ditches throughout the area. High-quality quota hunts occur on a limited basis from September to March.  Hike along the trails and enjoy the colorful flush of wildflowers in the spring and fall.

 




FWC Facts:
The world's whooping crane population has gradually increased from a low of 22 birds in 1941 to 503 birds in 2009.

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