Apalachee Wildlife Management Area

photo of Apalachee uplands
Jerry Pitts

Apalachee consists of nearly 8,000 acres along the Chattahoochee River and Lake Seminole in Jackson County three miles north of Sneads. The area is divided into three zones. The largest, Zone A, has approximately 520 acres of agricultural fields and encompasses many types of habitat: wetlands and ponds, rich bottomlands, and open stands of stately longleaf pines that tower over the wiregrass on upland areas. Zones B and C are primarily floodplain forests. Scenic River Road (CR 271) bisects much of the WMA and provides easy access for wildlife viewing year round. Wildlife you might see includes alligators, bald eagles, herons, gopher tortoise, fox squirrels, and beavers. Deer and duck hunting are good on the area. Some of the biggest deer in the state have come from Apalachee. The WMA also offers the best public land prospects for quail hunters in northwest Florida. Fishing is popular on Lake Seminole. The lake is nationally known for its largemouth, hybrid, striped, and white bass. Three boat landings, one on Lake Seminole and two on the Chattahoochee River, are located on this area. Camping is prohibited.  Three Rivers State Park is located 1 mile south of Apalachee WMA.

Rules Regarding Dogs

  • For purposes other than hunting, dogs are allowed, but must be kept under physical restraint at all times. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited.
  • Hunting dogs may be taken onto the WMA after 8 a.m. the day before the opening of a season and shall be removed by 6 p.m. one day after the end of the season. Hunting with dogs is prohibited, except bird dogs and retrievers may be used during all hunting seasons except archery and spring turkey. Dogs are prohibited in areas posted as "Closed to Public Access" by FWC administrative action. No person shall allow any dog to pursue or molest any wildlife during any period in which the taking of wildlife by the use of dogs is prohibited. Dogs on leashes may be used for trailing wounded game.



FWC Facts:
The painted bunting is one of the most rapidly declining songbirds in the eastern U.S. Surveys show an astounding 4-6 percent annual decrease in its numbers from 1966 to 2007.

Learn More at AskFWC