In support of the resource management goals and objectives for the area and to provide a quality experience for all area users, the following recreation activities are allowed.

White-tailed deer
White-tailed Deer

Hunting

Public hunting at Box-R debuted in fall 2004.  Hunting is limited to 2 to 7-day, high quality hunts from October to April. A hunting licenseWildlife Management Area Permit are required to hunt here, except for Small Game season and a quota permit may be required, except for hog still hunts, opening day dove hunt and small game season. Check the  Box-R Hunt Brochure for the type of quota permit required for each season. Permits will be issued by a random drawing from applications received from July 14 to July 30. Hog management hunts take place on select weekends during May-September and require a quota hunt permit.

The deer, turkey and hog populations on the area are fairly high. The area has a higher deer density and a herd age structure that is older than deer herds on most other lands in Franklin County. We are currently planting about 50 acres of wildlife openings including a dove field which is open to hunting without a quota permit on opening day of dove season.

Hunting Regulations, Map and Hunt Calendar 

 

Fishing

The Apalachicola River, Jackson River and small creeks and tributaries that flow through the property offer recreational opportunities for anglers and paddlers. Visitors find excellent fishing opportunities for largemouth bass, channel catfish, striped bass, bluegill and bream. Fresh and saltwater species are intermixed in nearby Lake Wimico, a 4,055-acre natural lake accessible only by boat via the Intracoastal Waterway (Jackson River) from Apalachicola or White City. Expect good bluegill and shellcracker fishing in the spring and early summer in this wide and shallow lake. No boat launches are located on site. Reference the map of Apalachicola River WEA PDF for current boat ramp locations in the area. Fishing license information.

Road through flatwoods
Road through flatwoods

Wildlife Viewing

The area's tidal freshwater and estuarine marshes, creeks, bottomland hardwoods and pine flatwoods, support both rare and common wildlife. The Apalachicola and Jackson rivers are an important component of the Apalachicola Bay ecosystem and commercial and recreational fisheries.  You may request a copy or download and print the Box-R Bird List PDF and/or the adjacent Apalachicola River Bird List PDF. Visit the  Wildlife page for more information about the area's wildlife.

Hiking

No formal trails have been developed but hikers may use the 40 miles of existing roads which provide access to rivers, creeks and most of the representative habitats.

Biking

Cyclists may use all existing roads and will encounter diverse habitats and wildlife. Off-road bicycles are well-suited for the unpaved roads at Box-R.

Horseback Riding

There are no designated equestrian trails but riding on all existing roads is permitted unless otherwise specified. You can access at several points including the main entrance and on the Bluff side. You can get a horse through the available opening at the main entrance. There is plenty on parking space for horse trailers on Tilton Rd.  Children under the age of 16 are required to wear a helmet when riding on public lands.  For more detailed information go to Nicole's Law PDF.  All horseback riders must have proof of current negative Coggins Test results for their horses when on state lands.

Paddling

Motorized and non-motorized boats may be launched at off-site facilities, which will provide access to the Apalachicola and Jackson rivers that border the property. Canoes and kayaks may enter two of the site's narrow creeks, Huckleberry Creek and Little Huckleberry Creek from these two rivers. The best times to paddle are fall and spring when temperatures are pleasant and bugs are few. Many paddling opportunities are available on the adjacent Apalachicola River WEA. Reference the map of Apalachicola River WEA PDF for current boat ramp locations in the area.



FWC Facts:
The spatulate bill of the roseate spoonbill has sensitive nerve endings that help it detect prey, and the shape helps the bird move sediment and catch the prey.

Learn More at AskFWC