Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program

The Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program (SNAP) is administered by the FWC's Division of Hunting and Game Management. SNAP is one of five components of Florida’s comprehensive Alligator Management Program. Its mission is to address complaints concerning alligators.

Persons with concerns about an alligator may call our toll-free Nuisance Alligator Hotline at 866-FWC-GATOR (866-392-4286). Generally, an alligator may be deemed a nuisance if it is at least four feet in length and the caller believes it poses a threat to people, pets or property.

SNAP uses contracted nuisance alligator trappers throughout the state to remove alligators from locations where they are unwanted or unwelcome. If a complaint meets the qualifying criteria, SNAP will issue a permit to a contracted nuisance alligator trapper authorizing the removal of the animal.

Complainants must be able to grant legal access to the property on which the alligator is located. SNAP does not permit the removal of nuisance alligators from private or publicly managed property without first obtaining permission from the property owner or management authority.

In 2013, SNAP received 14,915 nuisance alligator complaints resulting in the removal of 8,053 nuisance alligators.


Program News and Information

NEW!  FWC seeks contracted Nuisance Alligator Trappers for Broward County.
The Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program is accepting applications for nuisance alligator trappers for Broward County. Applicants must have a clean criminal history and no fish or wildlife violations.  Applicants must reside in the county for which they are applying and must have a valid working e-mail address.

All applications must be received by Monday, August 4, 2014. Follow this link for more information and to submit an application.  Send an e-mail to FWCGATOR@MyFWC.com with any questions about the available position.

What is a nuisance alligator?
Generally, an alligator may be considered a nuisance if it is at least four feet in length and is believed to pose a threat to people, pets or property.

Why aren’t small alligators removed? 
Alligators less than 4 feet in length are not large enough to be dangerous unless handled. They eat fish, frogs and other small animals. Typically, they are not large enough to be a threat even to small pets. The mere presence of a small alligator is not cause for concern. Occasionally, alligators less than 4 feet in length are legitimate problems and must be addressed. If an alligator less than four feet in length is a concern, call the Nuisance Alligator Hotline at 866-FWC-GATOR (866-392-4286).

Why does the FWC not relocate nuisance alligators in Florida?
Florida has a healthy and stable alligator population. We have about 1.3 million alligators in Florida. Alligators live in all 67 counties, and they inhabit all wild areas of Florida that can support them. The removal of nuisance alligators does not have a significant impact on our state's alligator population.

Relocated alligators often try to return to their capture site. They can create problems for people or other alligators along the way. If an alligator successfully returns, capturing it again would be necessary and likely more difficult the second time.

To avoid creating a problem at the release site, nuisance alligators would need to be relocated to remote areas where they would not encounter people. These remote areas already have healthy alligator populations, and the ones that already live there have established social structures. The introduction of a new alligator to these areas would likely cause fighting, possibly resulting in the death of a resident alligator or the introduced alligator.

Read A Guide to Living with Alligators (brochure)Adobe PDF


 



FWC Facts:
The scientific genus name of tarpon is Megalops - from the Greek adjective megalo meaning “large,” and the noun opsi, meaning “face.”

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